‘We need their brains’: donating to the brain bank in search of a dementia cure

From The Guardian, 14 November 2018: It’s a rainy Wednesday morning and Dr Andrew Affleck is driving more carefully than usual on his way to the Neuroscience Research Australia building in Randwick. It’s not just the slick, crowded roads putting the edge on his caution; in the boot of his car, cocooned in several layers Continue reading ‘We need their brains’: donating to the brain bank in search of a dementia cure

Exercise therapy for Parkinson’s disease

From ABC Health and Wellbeing, 21 August 2013: Argentine tango, tai chi and Pilates are activities you’d expect to find on offer in adult education classes, but emerging research shows these and other exercise therapies may also provide a range of benefits for people with Parkinson’s disease. Exercise therapy is emerging as a new and Continue reading Exercise therapy for Parkinson’s disease

Musical incentive program improves stride length in Parkinson’s

From Clinical Neurology News, 2 August 2013: SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – An iPod-based program using music as reward and behavioral reinforcement can lead to significant improvements in stride length and walking speed, according to data presented at the international congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders. The AmbuloSono system, developed by researchers from the University of Continue reading Musical incentive program improves stride length in Parkinson’s

Rasagiline added to dopamine agonist has small benefit in Parkinson’s

From Clinical Neurology News, 25 June 2013: Rasagiline is safe and efficacious as add-on therapy in patients with early Parkinson’s disease whose symptoms are not adequately controlled with dopamine agonist monotherapy, results from a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study suggest. Data from the ANDANTE study showed that adding rasagiline (1 mg/day) to dopamine agonist therapy led Continue reading Rasagiline added to dopamine agonist has small benefit in Parkinson’s

Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome frequency determined prospectively

From Clinical Neurology News, 24 June 2013: Nearly one-quarter of patients decreasing or stopping dopamine agonist therapy experience dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome, and one third of those suffer severe symptoms, according to results from the EuroDaws study. In the prospective, observational study of 51 patients with Parkinson’s disease who were withdrawn from dopamine agonist treatment, Continue reading Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome frequency determined prospectively

Criteria identify mild cognitive impairments in Parkinson’s

From Clinical Neur0logy News, 21 June 2013: Patients with mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease often show memory impairment and problems with visuospatial function, attention, and executive function, according to a study attempting to characterize the condition. A cohort study assessed 219 patients newly diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease but without dementia and 99 age-matched controls Continue reading Criteria identify mild cognitive impairments in Parkinson’s

Improved presurgery impulse control screening needed in Parkinson’s

From Clinical Neurology News, 19 June 2013: Many Parkinson’s disease centers performing deep brain stimulation surgery are not using formal, standardized screening for impulse control disorders in pre- or postsurgical patients, according to a large survey of Parkinson Study Group centers. Deep brain stimulation surgery is known to increase impulsivity, and standard practice is to Continue reading Improved presurgery impulse control screening needed in Parkinson’s