Platelet-rich plasma injections show no benefit in knee OA in placebo-controlled trial

From Medscape, 23 November 2021: A large randomized, placebo-controlled trial of platelet-rich plasma injections for knee osteoarthritis has found almost no symptomatic or structural benefit from the treatment, giving some clarity to an evidence base that has seen both positive and negative trials for the treatment modality. Given the need for better disease-modifying treatments for Continue reading Platelet-rich plasma injections show no benefit in knee OA in placebo-controlled trial

Delays in cancer referral, diagnosis linked with morbidities

Family Practice News, 15 December 2021: People with multiple preexisting chronic conditions experience a longer wait to receive a diagnosis of cancer and are more likely to be referred to an emergency department for their cancer, according to new research. These findings are based on a retrospective study of data from 11,716 cancer patients from Continue reading Delays in cancer referral, diagnosis linked with morbidities

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections Show No Benefit in Knee OA in Placebo-Controlled Trial

From Medscape, 23 November 2021: A large randomized, placebo-controlled trial of platelet-rich plasma injections for knee osteoarthritis has found almost no symptomatic or structural benefit from the treatment, giving some clarity to an evidence base that has seen both positive and negative trials for the treatment modality. Given the need for better disease-modifying treatments for Continue reading Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections Show No Benefit in Knee OA in Placebo-Controlled Trial

‘I hope you die’: how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientists

From Nature, 14 October 2021: Infectious-diseases physician Krutika Kuppalli had been in her new job for barely a week in September 2020, when someone phoned her at home and threatened to kill her. Kuppalli, who had just moved from California to the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, had been dealing with online abuse Continue reading ‘I hope you die’: how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientists

Why severe sickle-cell pain has been neglected

From Nature, 25 August 2021: “Dealing with pain is messy,” says John Roberts, an oncologist at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. It can’t be measured objectively through biomarkers or visualized on a scan, the experience of it varies enormously from person to person, and it can be fiendishly difficult to treat. Continue reading Why severe sickle-cell pain has been neglected

Gut microbiome may help or hinder defenses against SARS-CoV-2

From The Scientist, 31 August 2021: hen SARS-CoV-2 first began rampaging around the world, it was thought to primarily affect the respiratory system. It soon became clear that the virus had more far-reaching effects, including on the gastrointestinal system and its bacterial symbionts. This came as no surprise to Siew Ng, a gastroenterologist in the Continue reading Gut microbiome may help or hinder defenses against SARS-CoV-2

Australian research faces impending scarcity of lab rodents

From The Scientist, 20 July 2021: iomedical researchers across Australia are reeling in shock from the sudden news that the biggest supplier of laboratory mice and rats in the country—the Animal Resources Centre—will close its doors in around a year, with no plans in place to ensure a continued supply of animals to researchers. Malcolm Continue reading Australian research faces impending scarcity of lab rodents

How nanotechnology can flick the immunity switch

From Nature, 30 June 2021: Ever since 1796, when English scientist and physician Edward Jenner successfully inoculated an eight-year-old boy with cowpox to protect him from smallpox, vaccines have been a key tool for preventing disease. From smallpox to polio, diphtheria to COVID-19, vaccines have prevented more deaths from infectious disease than any other medical Continue reading How nanotechnology can flick the immunity switch