From German trains to South Korean buses, hydrogen fuel is back in the picture

From Ensia magazine, 8 November 2018: Jorgo Chatzimarkakis was refueling his hydrogen fuel-cell car at one of the 50-plus refueling stations scattered around Germany when a Tesla driver, who was recharging his own car, approached. The man was excited to see a hydrogen-powered car in action, and was brimming with questions. Chatzimarkakis, who is secretary Continue reading From German trains to South Korean buses, hydrogen fuel is back in the picture

As Australia’s mining boom wanes, rehabilitation of abandoned mines offers lessons for the world

From Ensia magazine, 11 October 2018: The 1986 Australian film Crocodile Dundee brought global fame to its leading man Paul Hogan, but the real star of the show was the vast, ancient landscape of the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park. Kakadu is the jewel in the crown of Australia’s national parks, but this unique wilderness Continue reading As Australia’s mining boom wanes, rehabilitation of abandoned mines offers lessons for the world

Australian fur-seal pups in decline for first time in three decades

From Nature News, 5 September 2018: Numbers of Australian fur-seal (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) pups have declined for the first time in more than three decades, according to a study published on 5 September. Researchers compared the latest count, collected in 2013-14, with an overall trend in the population since monitoring began in 1986. Pup numbers Continue reading Australian fur-seal pups in decline for first time in three decades

In Australia’s Snowy Mountains, a battle over brumbies

From Undark magazine, 25 July 2018: The peatlands that drape the high, treeless slopes surrounding Australia’s tallest peak form a natural archive. “They are unusual bits of landscape in that they actually record their own history,” says Geoffrey Hope, an environmental historian at the Australian National University, who has been studying these unique bogs for Continue reading In Australia’s Snowy Mountains, a battle over brumbies

Waste crisis: where’s your recycling going now?

From The Guardian, 26 June 2018: “Did you put the recycling out?” It’s a phrase regularly recited in millions of households across Australia, followed by a hollow rumble as the yellow-lidded wheelie bin is hauled to the kerb. It’s a ritual that, in one form or another, takes place in more than 90% of Australian Continue reading Waste crisis: where’s your recycling going now?

Tagging study sheds light on the elusive Swordfish

From Fish magazine, September 2017: If there is a holy grail of recreational fishing, it’s the Swordfish. Anglers talk about it in almost mythical terms: the unicorn of the sea, the Mount Everest of angling, the ultimate test of man versus (marine) beast. Even its scientific name – Xiphias gladius – translates from ancient Greek Continue reading Tagging study sheds light on the elusive Swordfish

China’s emissions trading scheme puts Australian companies on notice

From The Guardian, 4 October 2017: For a brief and shining moment in 2012, Australia was at the global forefront of climate change action, as one of the first countries to implement a carbon pricing mechanism. It lasted only two years, and was repealed amid much fanfare by the Abbott government in July 2014. During Continue reading China’s emissions trading scheme puts Australian companies on notice

South Australia goes all-out on renewables despite Federal focus on coal

From Ensia magazine, 13 October 2017: The Australian federal government’s love affair with coal has reached new levels in recent years, with federal ministers bringing chunks of the mineral into parliament and donning high-visibility mining vests as pro-coal publicity stunts. Yet against this backdrop, one Australian state has managed to break global records in the Continue reading South Australia goes all-out on renewables despite Federal focus on coal