Tagging study sheds light on the elusive Swordfish

From Fish magazine, September 2017: If there is a holy grail of recreational fishing, it’s the Swordfish. Anglers talk about it in almost mythical terms: the unicorn of the sea, the Mount Everest of angling, the ultimate test of man versus (marine) beast. Even its scientific name – Xiphias gladius – translates from ancient Greek Continue reading Tagging study sheds light on the elusive Swordfish

China’s emissions trading scheme puts Australian companies on notice

From The Guardian, 4 October 2017: For a brief and shining moment in 2012, Australia was at the global forefront of climate change action, as one of the first countries to implement a carbon pricing mechanism. It lasted only two years, and was repealed amid much fanfare by the Abbott government in July 2014. During Continue reading China’s emissions trading scheme puts Australian companies on notice

South Australia goes all-out on renewables despite Federal focus on coal

From Ensia magazine, 13 October 2017: The Australian federal government’s love affair with coal has reached new levels in recent years, with federal ministers bringing chunks of the mineral into parliament and donning high-visibility mining vests as pro-coal publicity stunts. Yet against this backdrop, one Australian state has managed to break global records in the Continue reading South Australia goes all-out on renewables despite Federal focus on coal

Volcanic eruptions may have contributed to war in ancient Egypt

From ABC Science, Wednesday 18 October, 2017: Distant volcanic eruptions may have indirectly triggered a series of revolts by the people of ancient Egypt against their despised Ptolemaic overlords. The eruptions, which took place between 305-30BC far from Egypt itself, may have altered the climate enough to reduce the annual Nile flooding. The resulting crop Continue reading Volcanic eruptions may have contributed to war in ancient Egypt

Can business save the world from climate change?

From Ensia magazine, 16 August 2017: “We are still in.” On June 5, 2017, with these four words a group of U.S. businesses and investors with a combined annual revenue of US$1.4 trillion sent a powerful message to the world: U.S. president Donald Trump may have withdrawn from the Paris agreement on climate change four Continue reading Can business save the world from climate change?

Securing Australia’s agricultural future

From KnowHow magazine: The ever-growing importance of plant biosecurity in Australia can be seen from the gradual evolution of the Cooperative Research Centres dedicated to it. What began as the Tropical Plant Pathology CRC in 1992 morphed into the CRC for Tropical Plant Protection in 1999, then into the CRC for National Plant Biosecurity in Continue reading Securing Australia’s agricultural future

No more business as usual: the corporates stepping up to save the planet

From The Guardian, 30 June 2017: When the US president, Donald Trump, announced his intention to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, one might have anticipated a hearty cheer from industry around the world relieved that business as usual could continue. Instead the opposite has happened. Across the United States, the business community is taking Continue reading No more business as usual: the corporates stepping up to save the planet

Arctic peatlands may release potent greenhouse gas as permafrost thaws

From ABC Science, 30 May 2017: Arctic peatlands may become a substantial source of a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide when they thaw, a new study suggests. The study by a team of Scandinavian scientists indicated that thawing permafrost could release nitrous oxide (N2O) — also known as ‘laughing gas’ — Continue reading Arctic peatlands may release potent greenhouse gas as permafrost thaws

Smart city: using technology to tackle traffic and social isolation in Melbourne

From The Guardian, 19 June 2017: Traffic congestion and social isolation are two concepts that don’t immediately appear to be connected. But in 2012, the Grattan Institute’s Social Cities report drew a direct line between inefficient urban transport and less time spent with friends and family. One estimate suggested every 10 minutes of commuting equates Continue reading Smart city: using technology to tackle traffic and social isolation in Melbourne