Australian researchers push to end politicians’ power to veto grants

From Nature News, 10 March 2022: Researchers in Australia have endorsed a proposal to remove government ministers’ power to veto grant-funding decisions made by expert science committees. They say this veto ability is just one example of Australia’s political overreach in research, and is a threat to academic freedom. Legislators in Australia are considering whether Continue reading Australian researchers push to end politicians’ power to veto grants

Australian researchers push to end politicians’ power to veto grants

From Nature, 10 March 2022: Researchers in Australia have endorsed a proposal to remove government ministers’ power to veto grant-funding decisions made by expert science committees. They say this veto ability is just one example of Australia’s political overreach in research, and is a threat to academic freedom. Legislators in Australia are considering whether to Continue reading Australian researchers push to end politicians’ power to veto grants

Atmospheric rivers dust the Alps

From Nature Middle East, 7 December 2021: Atmospheric rivers are long stretches of cloud that can carry enormous quantities of water vapour from the tropics towards the poles. They were first described in 19941 and since then have come to be understood as the major mechanism transporting moisture from lower latitude oceans to higher latitude Continue reading Atmospheric rivers dust the Alps

Scientists say Australian plan to cull up to 10,000 wild horses doesn’t go far enough

From Nature, 1 November 2021: Up to 10,000 feral horses might be killed or removed from Australia’s largest alpine national park under a draft plan to control the rapidly growing population of non-native animals. Scientists have welcomed the idea of removing them, but are alarmed that the plan still allows for thousands to remain, threatening Continue reading Scientists say Australian plan to cull up to 10,000 wild horses doesn’t go far enough

‘I hope you die’: how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientists

From Nature, 14 October 2021: Infectious-diseases physician Krutika Kuppalli had been in her new job for barely a week in September 2020, when someone phoned her at home and threatened to kill her. Kuppalli, who had just moved from California to the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, had been dealing with online abuse Continue reading ‘I hope you die’: how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientists

Most fossil-fuel reserves must remain untapped to hit 1.5 °C warming goal

From Nature, 8 September 2021: Nearly 90% of economically viable global coal reserves must be left in the ground to have even a 50% chance of hitting internationally agreed climate-change goals, according to an updated model of limits to fossil-fuel extraction, published today in Nature. For a 50% chance of remaining below 1.5 °C of Continue reading Most fossil-fuel reserves must remain untapped to hit 1.5 °C warming goal

First ancient human DNA found from key Asian migration route

From Nature, 26 August 2021: The 7,000-year-old skeleton of a teenage hunter-gatherer from Sulawesi in Indonesia could be the first remains found from a mysterious, ancient culture known as the Toaleans, researchers report this week in Nature1. The largely complete fossil of a roughly 18-year-old Stone Age woman was found in 2015 buried in a Continue reading First ancient human DNA found from key Asian migration route

Why severe sickle-cell pain has been neglected

From Nature, 25 August 2021: “Dealing with pain is messy,” says John Roberts, an oncologist at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. It can’t be measured objectively through biomarkers or visualized on a scan, the experience of it varies enormously from person to person, and it can be fiendishly difficult to treat. Continue reading Why severe sickle-cell pain has been neglected

How nanotechnology can flick the immunity switch

From Nature, 30 June 2021: Ever since 1796, when English scientist and physician Edward Jenner successfully inoculated an eight-year-old boy with cowpox to protect him from smallpox, vaccines have been a key tool for preventing disease. From smallpox to polio, diphtheria to COVID-19, vaccines have prevented more deaths from infectious disease than any other medical Continue reading How nanotechnology can flick the immunity switch

Mounting evidence suggests Sputnik COVID vaccine is safe and effective

From Nature News, 7 July 2021: Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine, Sputnik, has been the subject of fascination and controversy since the Russian government authorized its use last year, before early-stage trial results were published. Evidence from Russia and many other countries now suggests it is safe and effective — but questions remain about the quality of Continue reading Mounting evidence suggests Sputnik COVID vaccine is safe and effective