Hot and bothered: our health under climate change

From Ecos Magazine, 10 July 2014: As citizens living in a developed economy, we have a certain level of control over our health. Most of us have access to medicines, treatments and health services designed to cure our ills, or at least minimise pain. We also have access to information about dietary and lifestyle choices Continue reading Hot and bothered: our health under climate change

Tropical fish threaten kelp and algae

From ABC News in Science, 9 July 2014: Plant-eating tropical fish species are causing serious damage to algae and kelp forests in sub-tropical and temperate regions around the world, an international team of experts warn. The findings come from a review published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, which suggests that climate Continue reading Tropical fish threaten kelp and algae

Vulnerable dolphins keep to themselves

From ABC News in Science, 3 July 2014: Two dolphin species in north-western Australia are vulnerable to local extinction because they rarely mingle with their own kind outside their immediate location, a new study has found. The genetic analysis, published today in PLOS ONE, also identified one of the first cases of successful breeding between Continue reading Vulnerable dolphins keep to themselves

Damselfish ‘algal gardens’ harbour coral disease

From ABC News in Science, 25 June 2014: The unique damselfish practice of cultivating their favourite type of algae on coral reefs contributes to an increase in coral disease, Australian researchers have found. The study, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, also suggests that overfishing of other fish species may contribute to Continue reading Damselfish ‘algal gardens’ harbour coral disease

Citizen science a winner for shark conservation

From ABC News in Science, 24 April 2014: Citizen science has proven its worth by delivering better quality data on shark populations than conventional acoustic tagging methods, and at lower cost. Researchers from Australia and Palau compared data collected by professional dive guides in Palau with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks at the same Continue reading Citizen science a winner for shark conservation

Elephants tell human friend from foe by voice

From ABC News in Science, 10 March 2014: Elephants are able to distinguish between friendly humans and those more likely to pose a threat, based solely on vocal cues, new research shows. The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examines the extent to which African elephants use human voice Continue reading Elephants tell human friend from foe by voice

Desert cane toads no longer nocturnal

From ABC News in Science, 26 February 2014: Once creatures of the night, cane toads are now becoming active during the day to adapt as they move into semi-arid regions of Australia. Australian researchers used acoustic tags normally used to track fish movements and discovered that cane toads were accessing a dam during daylight hours, Continue reading Desert cane toads no longer nocturnal

What’s the wash-up from this chemical life?

From Ecos magazine, 6 November 2013: Every day, Australians flush relatively small – but significant – amounts of chemicals down the drain, many excreted from their own bodies. These micropollutants – from the diverse medicines, personal hygiene products, household cleaning agents, dietary supplements and other chemical products we now use routinely – make their way Continue reading What’s the wash-up from this chemical life?

Adaptation and race against climate change

From Ecos magazine, 15 July 2013: Five years ago, the federal government took what many felt was the visionary step of investing $50 million dollars in the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF). Despite its considerable achievements – which have been hailed globally – NCCARF last month failed to secure continued funding. The initiative Continue reading Adaptation and race against climate change